Aquafaba tryout

I suppose everyone has heard about aquafaba? That waste bean liquid that some genius discovered could be whiped for baking meringues with, instead of using egg whites. It is insane that it work, but simultaneously quite crazy that no one discovered it until just recently, you can see that foam building on top of the beans while cooking and that is quite a hint of the possibilities. There has been an explosion of people making all kind of different foods with it, cakes, butter, brownies, chocolate mousse etc. There is no end to it. I’m deeply fascinated by this phenomenon, and decided to try out some myself. Since most are based on chickpeas I decided to try the liquid from 4 different kinds of legumes. Chickpeas, soy beans, black lentils, and lima beans.

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So this is the way I carried it out. Soak all them for 12 hours. Cook according to instructions until ready, and then use the liquid. 5 tbsp. of each and measure the volume, time for whiping and taste. I used a hand whisk but went very steadily speed wise. I didn’t bake anything, just made the foam. So here are the results.

 

Lima beans. 10 min for whiping. Volume 250 ml or 1 cup. Strong bean flavour. Did break back into liquid after 30 min. Bad choice.

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Black lentils. 4 min, 500 ml or 2 cups. Very strong foam that hold for long before breaking down into liquid again, a bit strong lentil flavor, the foam was a bit darker.

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Soy beans. 3 min, 400 ml, 1,6 cus, Most subtle flavour. Easy to whip but the form did break down quicker than the lentils.

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Chickpeas. The original. 3 min, 400 ml, 1,6 cups, strong foam but not as strong as the lentils. Subtle flavour.

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Conclusion.

The strongets foam was from the black lentils, the foam also yielded the most volume after whiping. It did have a stronger flavour though.

I would say it is a tie between soy and chickpeas, where chickpeas was stronger in the foam but the soy’s taste was harder to distinguish. I guess it comes down to what your using them for.

Mushroom overload

My dad and me decided to go for a mushroom hunt last weekend. We heard that there wasn’t going to be many shrroooms in the forest this summer. It has been extremely hot and dry for most of July and that is quite bad if you want to have a party from the woods. But august has been rainy, and that changes things. We were out for 2 hours and got back with almost 11 kilos (24 punds)! I have never experienced anything like this. They were literary everywhere. We had to go back since our baskets got full. The most common word we exchanged during the walk was: found one! Followed by the variety. We had about 10 different edible kinds when we got back. And a few extra we didn’t know so we had to dig some in various books and on the net. But they all turned out to be quite nasty, not necessarily dangerous but not “favourable”. They went into the recycling bin.

Father on the schrrroum hunt

Father on the schrrroum hunt

We froze and dried the majority of them. Cleaning and cutting occupied the entire day, and three of us. But now we have mushrooms for many years. I even got 4 extra kilos (9 punds) when I went out for a run (!!) the day after. I brought a plastic bag with me incase there were going to be any along the path. It was full when I retuned. Pretty hard to run with a bag in one hand.

Porcini in the big pile

Porcini in the big pile

So what did we do with the rest of them? Well, since you don’t get the change to have this many different kinds of mushy things in front of you to often, we decided to try them out and how different they are from each other. We fried them in some oil and salt, separately, and had a small testing. Here are some thoughts:

The porcini were mild but complex in flavour, without any “peaks”, just a smooth and wide taste, earthy. The consistency was a bit slimy.

Red-capped scaber talk, not smily, it’s consistency didn’t change much with prolonged cooking. Great as a “filler” mushroom. The taste was very mild, almost to mild, quite boring actually.

Velvet bolete, Birch bolete and Slippery jack were all similar, slimy like the porcini, milder, but with more peaks, the taste wasn’t as smooth. Quite different, and very good.

Chantarelle, don’t think I have to write anything here…

False saffron milkcap, became very crispy, with a few distinct flavours, a bit acid and earthy, very very delicious.

Scotch bonnet, very very crisp. Wide taste with a few distinct flavours, a bit acid as well.

Parasol mushroom

Parasol mushroom

And the last one, parasol mushroom. My dad got quite worked up when we found this one. Many years since he had one (i might have tried it before, not sure). Looking like a quite poisonous little thing it turned out to be delicious, crisp and extremely complex, like the false saffron but with ten times more flavour. It even smelled great, quite sweet, like honey from the ground. It’s also big so it’s perfect for a burger, like you use portabello sometimes.

Testing

Testing

This vas a great testing, now I really know the difference, you should try it out, side by side comparison!

Love!

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