Nettle waffles with baba ganoush, simmered beet and olive sprinkle

I have been cleaning my kitchen for a few days now. Not only the regular cleaning with some soup and a dishcloth. I’m trying to get rid of ingredients I don’t use too often, they only take space in my cabinets. I tend to stock up on things that I believe to need for the moment, only to realize 6 month later that I never used them. I have rice paper, some supplements I thought I needed, flours of every possible kind and so on. It’s handy to have everything nearby; makes it possible to be spontaneous in cooking on a daily basis. Especially since I’m residing in the outback (well that was an exaggeration but anyway, you get the point). Most of the things come in handy but some don’t. And this leaves me with the cleaning. This is not a regular cleaning; I refuse to throw anything edible away. Instead I focus everything on that ingredient. If I have some rice paper I never use, I make rice wraps for 5 days in a row. A bit boring but you also get ridiculously creative. If left with one ingredient you try your best to make something good out of it if you’re eating it in a row. So this week has been one of those weeks.

One thing that I have too much of is dried nettles. Don’t get me wrong, I love nettles; it’s not something I’m trying to get rid of. It’s just that I have to damn much. They are super easy to dehydrate (as long as you were able to pick them without any burns), just let them lay on some fabric like a sheet or something and they will dehydrate in a few days. It’s easy to fill up jar after jar with dried nettles / powder. Fresh they are optimal for soups etc. but in the powder form they are harder to find a purpose for. You can mix them into smoothies, since they are said to be super healthy, or bake them into bread. But my favorite use is in pancakes and in waffles. Last night I made waffles. Here is my savory version. With a baba ganoush, some quick-pickled beets and a great olive sprinkle that I got from the peeps over at serious eats.

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Nettle waffles
 
What you need
  • ½ tbsp chia seeds, ground + 4 tbsp water
  • 120 g oat flour
  • 120 g quinoa flour
  • 2½ tsp aluminum-free baking powder
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • 4 tbsp powdered nettles
  • ¼ cup oil
  • 1½ cups warm almond milk
How to do it
  1. Mix the dry ingredients.
  2. Add the wet ones. Mix, it should be lika a thick running batter, if not, add some more water.
  3. Heat the waffle iron. With a kitchen towel, add some oil to the iron. Heat until slightly browned.

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Baba ganoush
 
What you need
  • 2 eggplants
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 2 tbsp juice from 1 lemon
  • 2 tbsp tahini
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • A bunch of chopped fresh parsley
  • Sea salt to taste
  • Some mint
How to do it
  1. Split the eggplants lenghtwise. Broil the them for up to an hour in the oven with some oil on top. They should be really muchy.
  2. In a food process mix everything (I like when the skin is still in the mix). Season to taste.

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Simmered beet
 
What you need
  • Peeled beet
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Salt
How to do it
  1. Soak in vinegar and salt.
  2. Simmer for 2 min.

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Assemble to your liking. Happy weekend!

Braised fennel with buckwheat polenta

The diversity of buckwheat is amazing. Either you can boil it for porridge, use it as a thickening agent, make crepes from it, raw crackers or even sprout them for a great granola. The other day I made the creamiest sauce from sprouted and dehydrated sprouts. There are literary thousands of ways to cook those seeds/grains or whatever you want to call them.

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I remember about 8 years ago, when I first encountered them. It was in Japan, and I had just got my hand on one of my first cookbooks. The enlightened kitchen, an amazing healthy vegetarian Japanese cookbook. And with some vague idea to make every recipe in it I started with a sesame soup and the continued for the buckwheat crepes. Just a great idea, damn that was a hassle, trying to find buckwheat without speaking any Japanese and without knowing what it actually was. From the picture in the book I could figure out that the flour was supposed to be a bit more grey then the white all purpose flour I was used to. Thanks to a helpful clerk I managed to find it. I tried it out, it was a semi-successful first try, the crepes cracked, wasn’t as easy to flip over as regular ones. It looked like a mess, but the taste was great.

Since then I didn’t use it again until a few years back. I don’t know why, I just didn’t. But as part of a growing awareness of the ridiculous amounts of normal flour I eat, it came back. And to stay this time. It is a great non glutinous alternative, but keep in mind, you can’t just switch since buckwheat has completely different properties. Now let’s make something completely different, a buckwheat polenta with veggies.

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Braised fennel with buckwheat polenta
 
What you need
  • For the veggies
  • 1 fennel bulb, cut into 4 pieces
  • 6 whole garlic cloves
  • 0.5 cup dired and rehydrated porcini mushroom
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 bunch fresh thyme and estragon
  • 1 pinch cloves
  • 0.5 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper
  • For the buckwheat polenta
  • ⅔ cup buckwheat groats
  • 3 bay leafs
  • 0.5 tbsp dried oregano
  • 0.5 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper
  • Peel from one lemon
  • Soaking water from porcini mushrooms
How to do it
  1. Veggies
  2. Heat the top broiler of your oven to max temperature.
  3. Steam the fennel and whole garlic cloves until almost tender.
  4. In a mortar, mash all the spices, oil, vinegar, salt and pepper to a pesto like runny paste.
  5. Place the veggies with the drained porcini mushrooms on an oven pan, pour the paste over and grill close to the top of the oven until the veggies get a nice brown crust.
  6. Polenta
  7. Boil the polenta with some salt in the double amount of water for 15 min
  8. Add the spices, lemon peel, vinegar and polenta. Also add the soaking water from the mushrooms.
  9. Boil until it becomes porridge thick, add more water if needed. Use a hand blender to make it smooth.
  10. Serve with veggies on top.

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Grape leaf pie

My mother has grown grapes in her back garden since it was tiny, really tiny. Even before the time when you “could” grow them. Everyone just asked how it was possible for them to grow this far north? If it can grow here by means of evolution or a quick version by human selection I don’t know. But the vines are alive and they even hold grapes every other year or so. There has to be a good summer. They have grown beyond the state where they are just nice to have around, to something we have to take care of, they have occupied much of the outdoor space just next to their house. The vines spread everywhere. Just a pity I didn’t grab a photo of them last summer.

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But why do I tell all this? Because it’s strange. We have never thought about the leaves. Ever. And then you have it quite regularly in some oriental cuisines. They have always just been there, in the garden. How blind you can be to the things just next you?

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A few months back I made some dolmades and they tasted great. I also grabbed a bunch, blanched them and put them in the freezer. They have been there a few months now. Just until I read a grape leaf pie recipe from Yotam Ottolenghi. Time to use the leaves again. It’s like dolmades but in the shape of a pie, and where the leafs act as the crust. This one is inspired from his version, but made vegan. I’ll hope you enjoy it. What you serve it with is up to you, be creative!

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Grape leaf pie
 
What you need
  • 15 grape leaves
  • 1 yellow, mnced onion
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tbsp pine nuts
  • ½ tbsp fresh tarragon
  • 2 tbsp fresh parsley
  • 3 tbsp fresh dill
  • 3 tbsp fresh mint
  • Zest from one lemon
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • salt and black pepper
  • ½ cup rice flour
  • 4 tbsp breadcrumbs
How to do it
  1. Heat the oven to 200 C or 390 F.
  2. My grape leaves were frozen from last autumn. I thawed them by soaking in almost boiling water for 10 min. Do the same if you’re using fresh leaves. Canned ones are good to go without any pre-heating.
  3. Greece a medium pan for the oven. And then evenly spread the breadcrumbs. Layer the grape leaves as a crust. Save some for the top.
  4. To make the filling or stuffing. Fry the minced onion until golden brown. Add, nuts, herbs, lemon zest and juice, rice flour and the water. Add more water if it gets to thick, it should be like a thick porridge. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Fill the grape leaf crust with the filling. Fold the leaves over the filling and add some extra leaves on the top.
  6. Brush it with some oil and then add enough breadcrumbs to cover.
  7. Bake it for 30 min in the oven, until crisp and slightly browned. Enjoy!

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Wild mushroom tacos

Childhood memories of food can sometimes be extremely strong and sometimes equally weak. I remember how me and my sister would go crazy every time our mother made her “open” pie, a crust, a bean spread and some veggies on top, served with some kind of sauce. It tasted the same, every singe time, and it was fantastic.

On the other hand, a rather weak memory got back to me the other year, when I wanted to make something new for breakfast. I dialed my mother’s phone to ask for advice. She got excited at once and told me to grind sesame seeds with raisins and some water, to make a paste of yoghurt consistency. The idea sounded okey, just 3 ingredients, nothing astonishing. But 15 min later, when I sat down for the breakfast I was amazed. Not from the fantastic taste, it was ok, nothing special, but from all the memories it evoked. I had not though about that dish, at all, but supposedly it had effected me a lot. I can’t say exactly what memories I got, it was just a shower of emotions. The paste/purée or what ever you might call it had just escaped my memory.

The recipe below is the opposite. Tacos was a common Friday dinner at my childhood home, tortillas with stuffing and then warmed in the oven. One thing applied to them, just as above, they tasted the same every time. And I never wanted to taste anything else, they were just perfect. UNTIL I tasted those, wholegrain spelt tortillas, with wild mushroom filling, might be my new favourite Friday snack, served with your favourite salsa or veggies.

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Wild mushroom filling
 
What you need
  • 2 fresh red chiles
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 onion, cut into strips
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 500 g wild mushrooms, chopped into inch sized dices
  • 4 cups sliced chard
How to do it
  1. Heat the pan to medium, place the chilis (wihout any oil) in the pan, rotate regularly, until brown and blackened. The remove the stems and seeds and chop them into small pieces.
  2. Heat the pan, add the oil then sauté the onion and garlic until lightly brown. Add the coconut milk, chilies and salt. Simmer for a few min.
  3. Add the mushrooms and chard. Continue to simmer for 7-8 min, until most for the liquid has boiled away.

Spelt tortillas
 
What you need
  • 1½ cups spelt berries, ground in a mill or 2 cups spelt flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1½ tsp baking powder
  • ¾ cup hot water
How to do it
  1. In a bowl, mix all ingredients well. Cover and let sit for about 20 minutes.
  2. Divide into 8 equal parts. Roll into a ball.
  3. Use a rolling pin to make it paper thin, remember to flip it several times. Sometimes it can help to make them thin on some parchement paper, makes it easier to remove when they get thin enough.
  4. Preheat a pan to medium heat.
  5. Place the tortilla in the pan, until bubbles form. Flip it and heat for another 30 sec. Place in a damp cloth. So they don't get dry.

 

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Assembly:

Place the filling on the tortilla and make a roll. If you like to, heat the oven, and warm them until the wraps get crispy. Serve with some salsa and or veggies.

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Swedish cheese cake, without cheese

Whenever one speaks of a cheese cake here in Sweden there is a micro moment appearing when your trying to assert what kind of cheese cake he or she talked about. Is it the American version with a hard crusty bottom and a cream cheese filling, or is it the Swedish one that is more like a pudding in consistency and eaten with cream and jam? Some years back the Swedish one would have been the given one, but not american ones seem to be more common. This post is all about the Swedish one. I grew up with it. I love it. But I don’t love the cheese.

At a party some years ago they had made a cheese cake called a false cheese cake, with one big difference. No cheese, it was substituted with, guess what? Zucchini. I could believe it, and had tro try it. It was damn amazing, the zucchini flavour was barley noticeable, and if it did one thing is was just to add some richness to the overall taste of it. Genius! The bad thing was that it had eggs (no worries at the time being), so this is my vegan version.

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As I said, it is normally eaten with whipped cream and jam. But please, go with whatever, milk, or berries you decide. This might be something for the new years party?

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Swedish false cheese cake
 
What you need
  • 2 cups peeled and chopped zucchini
  • 3 tbsp whole grain flour
  • 2 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • ⅔ cup almonds, ground
  • 2 bitter almonds, ground
  • 3 tbsp agave or honey
  • 1 pinch of salt
How to do it
  1. Boil the zucchini in water for a few minutes until it becomes soft and mushy.
  2. Drain the water and mash the zucchini with a fork.
  3. Soak the chia in a 4 tbsp of the almond milk, allow to sit for 10 min.
  4. Simmer the rest of the milk with the oil, sweetener, and flour. It should thickening a bit.
  5. Mix all the ingredients in a bowl.
  6. Add some baking paper to a bread pan. Pour the mixture in it.
  7. Bake for 1 hour 15 min in 200°C or 390°F.
  8. Allow to cool a bit before serving.

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Chickpea parsnip pizza

I have no idea if you can call this a pizza or not. It does not have a glutinous pizza crust, no tomato sauce and definitely no cheese. The crust isn’t very crisp, the sauce is very thick, and the veggies are pre-fried. And it definitely doesn’t have the cheese stuffed edges that some fast-food joints offer. Nothing like a pizza, but I’m going to call it that anyway. Just because its layered the same way and cause I find it much more appealing than a regular one. And sticking to a historic ways of describing something isn’t for me. As long as you get the point of what this is. Who says that pizza needs cheese? I don’t.

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The ingredients are much more local and seasonal which is a big plus. You can find everything at the local farmers market, or in the garden. Roots and beet greens. The crust is an oven baked batter from chickpeas.

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You will get full, not the heavy disgusted way of full you get from a regular pizza but full enough to ask yourself why you didn’t stop earlier. Might be something characteristic with me, or as my friend put it: you don’t stop eating until you hate yourself. That is something I have to deal with, damn eating in moderation is hard. Every time I get full, I tell myself I just need a tiny bit more, and from there its just downhill. Don’t follow me, I’m just lucky I don’t get fat from it.

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Chickpea socca pizza crust
 
Serves: 2 crusts
What you need
  • 240 g chickpeas (I milled them myself) or chickpea flour
  • 2 cups water
  • 0.5 cup olive oil
  • 1 garlic clove
  • Salt
How to do it
  1. Mix the water, chickpea flour, halv of the oil, minced garlic and salt. Allow to sit for 1 hour.
  2. Make the topping and sauce, recipe below.
  3. Heat the oven to 220C or 425F. Place an oven proof pan in the oven until hot. Remove and add 1-2 tbsp oil to the pan. Add half the batter and cook in the oven for about 8 min. Once done, remove from the pan, and repeat with the other half of the batter.

Parsnip sauce with topping
 
What you need
  • Sauce
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 3 medium parsnips
  • 1 leek, the white parts
  • 1-2 sprigs of thyme, leaves chopped (optional)
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • Big splash of apple cider vinegar
  • Salt and pepper
  • Water
  • Topping
  • A big handful of beet greens, or other greens
  • Hydrated sun dried tomatoes, amount to your liking
How to do it
  1. Add the oil to a pan. Fry the leeks, garlic and parsnips until soft and golden brown on medium
  2. Mix all the ingredients in a blender and blend smooth.
  3. Use the same pan and quickly add the beet greens, just so the get a burnt touch, a few seconds might be enough.
  4. Add the sauce to the pizza crust. Top it with the beets and sun dried tomatoes.
  5. Put in the oven for 10-15 min, allowing the flavors to blend a bit and to get a crisp outer layer.

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Corn and mint slaw, plus all those organic plastic bags.

I’m trying to eat everything completely organic. I used to go under the mentality that if they don’t have it organic in stock I’ll just go for the non-organic version. But for the last two years or so everything that has entered my fridge has been 100% organic. When I lived in Gothenburg everything was just great, going to the local organic shop to stock up on nearby grown fruits end veggies, everything was just thumbs up. But since I don’t live there anymore I have to partly rely on the local supermarket. They are good when it comes to organic, really good, especially since its on the countryside. No complaints but one thing. Everything organic is put into its own little plastic wrapping. One big plastic package for a tiny ginger, the broccoli comes one by one in a small almost vacuum bag. For me, just part of it is the organic thing, the other part is just trying (and constantly failing) to affect the environment as little as possibly. Those things often come hand in hand right? I know that the packages are there to separate them from the non-organic veggies, but there must be a better way to do this? I have so much more plastic waste since the switch and that is really counter productive. This is not the way to go!

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But no more complaints. I love this slaw, and to connect the text with the previous sentence, the cabbage just had a tiny plastic ribbon on it, a little bit better I guess. Pan-roasted corn, mint. And a fat-free tofu mayo to add the sweet-sour creamy yum.

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Corn and mint slaw
 
What you need
  • Salad
  • ¼ head shredded white cabbage
  • 4 medium carrots, cut into strips or shredded
  • 2 corn cobs or 1 can corn kernels (I used the canned)
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 100 ml apple cider vinegar
  • A few springs of mint
  • Parsley for garnish
  • Dressing
  • Half a block firm tofu
  • 150 ml water
  • 1 tbsp vinegar
  • 2 tsp mustard, hot
  • 1 tbsp honey or other sweetener
  • A pinch of cayenne
  • Salt and pepper
How to do it
  1. Place the cabbage and carrots in a big bowl, add the vinegar and mint. Massage is for a while, so the cabbage gets soft and mushy. Let it marinate for 30 min.
  2. Meanwhile heat a pan, add the oil and grill the corn on medium / high until brown on the sides.
  3. Add all the ingredients for the dressing into a blender. You can use some liquid from the slaw marinade instead of vinegar. It should get creamy, if not add more water.
  4. When the cabbage mix is done marinating, pour out some liquid if it has released much, so the final slaw doesn't get to thin. Add the dressing, corn and mix well.
  5. Serve and garnish with some parsley.

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Corn soup with hops and fried purple potato

A while back, while still eating cheese, eggs and those things, I found a recipe of a corn, cheese and beer soup. Sounding like a real oddity from Wisconsin  I had to try it. Some things just work together, like chocolate in a chili but this one, damn it was awful. Its very rare that I have to throw something away, but now it went right to the compost. Thrown away and never to be remembered. End of story.

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How wrong I was. Since I harvested all those hops in the late summer I have thought to make some use to them. And hops, being the main flavor of beer with that bitterness the ideas started to sprout: how about using them instead of the actual beer? The more I thought about it, the more it made sense. Corn being very sweet, it needs something to balance that sweetness with, so it becomes something different and more complex. I decided to try this on, omit the cheese, and make a corn and hops soup. This was better, much better. Sweet, salt and a bit bitter, yum.

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But please do one thing. Skip the hop as decoration. Trying to be cleaver and taking a good photo I sprinkled a hop over the soup. Indeed, it does look good right? Yellow, purple, green and those small leaves. But the taste gets to intense, just skip them, go for the green and purple only.

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Corn soup with hops and fried purple potato
 
What you need
  • Soup
  • 400 g corn kernels, fresh, canned of frozen
  • 2 medium white potatoes, cut into dices
  • 1 yellow onion, minced
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 4 bay leaves
  • 3 cups water
  • Oil
  • 2 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 4-7 hops (bitterness varies)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Garnish
  • 3 medium purple potatoes, cut into really small dices
  • Some thyme
  • Oil, salt and pepper
How to do it
  1. Soup
  2. Heat the oil, add the onion and garlic, heat gently for 15 min, till soft and golden.
  3. Add the potatoes and fry for another 5 min.
  4. Pour the water over the fried veggies, and get the boiling started. Add the hops, one by one, just to make sure the bitterness doesn't get to strong. You should just notice it, not more. Trust your taste buds.
  5. Add the salt, pepper and vinegar. Use a hand blender to make it smooth. I used a regular blender with a glass jar once, that was a bad idea.
  6. Garnish
  7. To make the garnish, heat a frying pan, add the oil, and the potatoes. Fry/sauté until soft on the inside and crisp on the outside. Season with thyme, salt and pepper.
  8. Assembly
  9. Serve the soup while warm, garnish with the potatoes and some parsley.

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Pumpkin lasagna, with tofu ricotta and sprouted noodles

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Please beware, this recipe will take forever to make, plus a lot of preparation in advance. Prepare to spend several hours in the kitchen. I guess you could make it quick with store-bought pasta and so, but thats no fun. It is def worth the time.

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It was a few years back when I first came in contact with sprouted flours. I saw in a local health food store that they carried some sprouted bread, and then when digging I found that people also used sprouted flour. So why use this instead of regular whole grain flour? Well some people claim that since you sprout the grain before dehydrating and milling, it will become more easy to digest since your actually eating a small plant and not a grain. I don’t know, at least I don’t experience any difference in what my stomach tells me. But what I do see is a difference in taste. It becomes much more nutty once you spout it before eating (the gluten doesn’t work as good though). Last year I made gingerbread cookies from sprouted flour and the taste was amazing. So when it comes to the health aspect, I can recognise it, and there might be something to it, but taste is the big thing for me.

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So how does this work? Well if your lucky you can find spouted flour in the store. If your not that lucky, you have to make your own. I wasn’t that lucky. I have never seen any spouted flour in the Swedish shops. So I have to make it from scratch. When you spout you soak the grains for about 12 hours, then you pour the water, and continue to rinse the grains twice daily until the sprout is about the same length as the grain itself. I made my sprouted flour from spelt berries. Finding grains in the store that works for sprouting can be pretty challenging. Grains have about two years after harvest while they are still easily to sprout. The older they get, the harder it is. And because grains in the supermarket hasn’t been handled with care, my experience is that they don’t sprout, they just rot. So getting them fresh in the autumn from a local farmer is your best option, and start to make the flour as quickly as possible.

One the sprout is long enough you you have to dry them. You can either use your oven with the lid open, lowest temperature until dry, or a dehydrator. So now you have your hand full of those grains with a tail, how do you make them into flour? I have a stone mill that I can attach to my kitchen assistant. Other ways to do it to use a coffee mill or a high speed blender. And here we are, with the final flour.

For the freezer

For the freezer

This lasagna requires pumpkin puree. I only had a gigantic Blue Hubbard at home so, it was a great opportunity to make some puree for the winter/spring. I placed the leftovers in small bags and froze them. Much better than the over priced and sometimes toxic cans in the store.

Now let’s make some lasagna noodles and a hearty lasagna.

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Lasagna noodles from sprouted flour
 
What you need
  • 180 grams sprouted spelt berries
  • 120 grams regular spelt berries
  • 6 gram salt
  • water
How to do it
  1. Start by mixing the berries and milling them into flour, I use my stone mill, but a coffee grinder or high speed blender might also work.
  2. Place the flour in the food processor, mix in the salt. While running, add the water, until the consistency is like a hard pie dough.
  3. Allow it to rest covered in the fridge for 30 min.
  4. Use a pasta maker (I have no idea what they are called, hope you understand). Divide the dough into 8 small balls, flatten them before putting in the machine. Make the noodles as thick or as thin as you like. The thinner, the more noodles and the more layers for the lasagna.
  5. My suggestion is to wait to make the final noodles until it's time to layer the lasagna, since they easily dry out and become really fragile.

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Pumpkin lasagna with tofu ricotta and kale
 
What you need
  • For the pumpkin mash:
  • Once 600-800 gram pumpkin
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 0.5 tsp cinnamon
  • salt
  • pepper
  • For the kale layer:
  • Kale
  • Caramelised onion:
  • 2 yellow onions
  • 1 red onion
  • salt
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • Tofu ricotta
  • 200 grams hard tofu
  • 0.5 cup sunflower seeds
  • 2 tbsp sage
  • Juice from half a lemon
  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • salt
  • pepper
  • water
  • Dehydrated black currants, then soaked
How to do it
  1. Pumpkin mash:
  2. Heat the oven to 200C or 390F. Split the pumpkin and remove the seeds. Place on an oven plate with skin up. Het until soft. Usually takes around 40-50 min.
  3. Remove and let it cool of a while. Scrape the flesh into a bowl, add the cinnamon, oil, and season with salt and pepper to your liking. Mash it with a fork.
  4. Kale:
  5. Rinse the kale, remove the stem and cut into strips.
  6. Caramelised onions:
  7. Gently heat the oil in a thick bottom pot.
  8. Peel the onions, cut into larger pieces or into rings.
  9. Add to the pot with the salt.
  10. Fry it on low for 30 min.
  11. Tofu ricotta:
  12. Add all the ingredients to a blender, start by using 0.25 cup water. Add more water if necessary. It should be like a spreadable cream.
  13. Assembly:
  14. Layer all the ingredient to your liking. Remember that the kale is raw and a bit dry so it will work best if layered together with either ricotta or pumpkin and not between two pasta layers. I also added the currants, love the four suprice they will give (dehydrating and soaking makes them keep in one piece, so the entire lasagna doesn't get all blue). Fining with pumpkin can decorate with the ricotta.
  15. Mine was something like:
  16. kale - pumpkin - pasta - onions - pasta - pumpkin - pasta - kale - ricotta - pasta - pumpkin ricotta.
  17. Place it in the oven for about 30-35 min. 200C or 390F (still warm and running from the pumpkin mash).
  18. Allow to cool for 20 min.
  19. Finish with some pepper and something green on top and your done!

output

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So was it worth it?

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Fuck christmas with this indian lentil stew

Two days ago, a big christmas market open for the weekend at my work. Thousands of people shopping and indulging, my parents included =). Quite paradoxically there was snow in the morning, and it continued to snow the entire day. White christmas right? But damn this is to early, both for that feeling, and the snow. Don’t think I’v experienced that much snow (gone now) this early before. It could wait for a good month or so. Bot now it’s here and how does one escape that christmas feel? Just so you don’t continue whistling christmas songs at home (with I  could whistle so that sentence actually made sense)? You make this hearty indian stew, thats how!

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Indian lentil stew
 
What you need
  • 1 cup of beluga lentils
  • 1 onion cut into rings
  • 2 garlic cloves, sliced
  • ⅔ cups coconut milk
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • A small piece fresh ginger, grated
  • 1 small fresh chili
  • 1 tbsp garam masala
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp black mustard seeds
  • Salt
  • Top of with:
  • Coconut flakes
  • Mustard seeds
  • And some steamed veggies
How to do it
  1. Cook the lentil with some salt according to instructions. Or about the double amount of water, 15-20 min.
  2. While cooking, heat the oil gently.
  3. Add the onions, heat them on low for about 15 min, then add the garlic. Give them another 10-15 min to develop color and sweet flavours.
  4. Add the spices, ginger, mustard seeds (make sure they don't pop) and chili to the onions, fry for a few minutes.
  5. Add the coconut milk, cook until slightly evaporated, and more stew like. Season with salt and the lemon juice.
  6. Serve with mustard seeds, coconut flakes and some steamed veggies.

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